Simply Kailua

Today we made a deliberate attempt to take the U in Urban Sketchers literally and chose an almost random location in Kailua to make the point that sketching does not need “iconic sights” — sketch-worthy views are everywhere. Kailua Public Library made for a wonderful base by providing parking, shade trees, and a welcome roof in case of the odd shower. Not to mention the library’s friendly security officer with a penchant for sketching who joined us for show-and-tell. Bookshelves, trees, cars, utility poles, flowers, storefronts and, of course, the library building itself all made appearances in our work.

As always, don’t forget to check out our sketches on Flickr and upload your own!

Stay tuned for our next events in August – to be announced soon!

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Wind and Water

T’was a windy and busy morning at Kailua Beach Park. Kayakers, paddlers, kite surfers, sunbathers – and sketchers, of course. We were delighted to be joined by four newcomers (including two very junior attendants who added greatly to the creativity on display). Show-and-tell featured musings about the agony of sketching pine-needle infused sand and our apparently universal fascination with tree stumps. We should have brought swim trunks.

As always, don’t forget to check out our sketches on Flickr and upload your own!

See you at our next event on April 9 at the AIA Center for Architecture!

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A Wholesome Get-together

Yesterday evening we descended upon Kailua’s Whole Foods Market. The purpose of our visit was in danger of taking a backseat to admiring and sampling the tasty and beautifully arranged food – but, once fed, we managed to focus on the task at hand. As usual there was no shortage of worthy sketch subjects. Time passed quickly, and the setting sun added challenges to those of us sketching outside.

At show-and-tell we lined a bench with our sketches and chatted about what drew us to the scenes and media we had chosen. Ivan treated us to a digital sketch of the bar area that combined computer emulations of pen and watercolor, and newcomer Eric brought a new (real life) medium into the mix: acrylic paint pens.

Since this was another, rare midweek event (evening too), we would appreciate feedback on how these work for everyone. Feel free to leave a comment or send us email. And, as always, don’t forget to check out the day’s sketches on Flickr – and upload yours!

Our next event will be on July 9 at Koko Head Botanical Garden. Stay tuned for details!

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At Kailua Beach Park

After four events in Honolulu it was high time to cross the Pali. The weather was spectacular: not a cloud in the sky and barely a ripple in the sea. Quite a contrast to The Eddie last week.

Like so often before, a slew of sights begged for our attention; and, again like so often before, the morning flew by – time to gather! New arrivals and USkO veterans shared sketches and techniques in our show-and-tell circle. Color pencils became the theme of the day, taking center stage both in Ivan’s sketch of paddlers entering the bay, and in Kev’s fabulous multi-color revolver pencil. Diversity ruled though, as watercolors, charcoal, pen, and pencil all made appearances too. Sketching is fun, but to us the mini exhibition at the end of our events is always the highlight. Again, a few of us stayed longer to tweak sketches or even start new ones.

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Our next event is at the Prince Kūhiō Festival in Kapi‘olani Park. Don’t miss it!

Check out the artwork on the USkO Flickr Group.


A Red-Hot Afternoon at GAAH

At the invitation of Glass Arts Association of Hawai‘i (GAAH), Urban Sketchers O‘ahu attended the glass artists’ Saturday open house. In a welcoming setting with pupus and live music, sketchers captured live glass shaping and blowing while keeping a safe distance from the blazing furnaces and red-hot globs of glass. GAAH founder Ted Clark and fellow staff demonstrated the creation of friggers and helped visitors make their first pieces of glass art. Just like sketchers, glass artists have to work fast – not because their subjects move but because they solidify!

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It was a fascinating introduction to a 3D art form that many of us had not had first-hand experience with, and we certainly plan to be back.